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Monday, October 12, 2020 | History

3 edition of Correlations between annual precipitation and the yield of spring wheat in the Great Plains found in the catalog.

Correlations between annual precipitation and the yield of spring wheat in the Great Plains

John S. Cole

Correlations between annual precipitation and the yield of spring wheat in the Great Plains

by John S. Cole

  • 235 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Wheat -- Great Plains,
  • Precipitation (Meteorology) -- Great Plains

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby John S. Cole ; United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry, in cooperation with the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Montana, North Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado, and Kansas.
    SeriesTechnical bulletin / United States Department of Agriculture -- no. 636, Technical bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 636.
    ContributionsUnited States. Dept. of Agriculture.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination40 p. :
    Number of Pages40
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23045949M
    OCLC/WorldCa9681555

    Understanding spring wheat growth and development is essential to achieving optimum productivity. Spring wheat proceeds through a sequence of easily recognizable growth stages that are described by several staging schemes, the most comprehensive being the Zadoks system. Growing conditions and management decisions at any stage can impact the crop’s . Hard red spring wheat, durum wheat and oats all had lowest yields in the s and highest yields in the s, with increases in yield averag 24 and 58 bu/ac respectively (Fig. 3, 4 and 5). Statistically speaking, average barley and spring wheat yields were consistent through the s and 50s, increased in the 60s, and then increased.

    average precipitation and remained in severe to exceptional drought conditions. In contrast, Nebraska through the upper Great Plains and across the Pacific Northwest entered the winter with very good soil moisture conditions throughout the soil profile which extended into the spring. The wheat crop in parts of southern Kansas, Oklahoma.   At least 80% of the more than 7 M ha of spring wheat grown each year is planted to CWRS varieties (Statcan ), regardless of the fact that Canadian prairie spring wheat has a 15–20% higher yield potential than CWRS (Campbell et al. ). In semi-arid regions, spring wheat is traditionally grown in cropping systems that include summer Cited by:

      Wheat accounts for around 20% of the calories that humans consume and as such is the leading source of plant protein. It is well-known that wheat productivity is sensitive to both natural climate Author: Ehsan Najafi. Abstract: Effects of Climate Change on Wheat Yields in the Central Great Plains By the global population will be between 10 and 11 billion people (the Guardian). Climate change, meanwhile, is worsening and threatening our current food supply, particularly wheat.


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Correlations between annual precipitation and the yield of spring wheat in the Great Plains by John S. Cole Download PDF EPUB FB2

3 'Correlations between annual precipitation and the yield of spring wheat in the Great Plains', U.S. Department of Agriculture Technical Bulletin (); T. BLAIR, 'Rainfall and spring wheat', U.S. monthly weather review, 41 (), 4 T. BLAIR, 'Temperature and spring wheat in the Dakotas', U.S.

monthly weather review, Get this from a library. Correlations between annual precipitation and the yield of spring wheat in the Great Plains. [John S Cole; United States. Department of Agriculture.]. Cover Crop Effect on Subsequent Wheat Yield in the Central Great Plains David C.

Nielsen,* Drew J. Lyon, Robert K. Higgins, Gary W. Hergert, There was an average 10% reduction in wheat yield following a cover crop compared with replenished by precipitation between the time of cover crop ter.

Cole () related the yield of spring wheat to crop season rainfall in the semi-arid Great Plains of the U.S.A. using linear regressions and succeeded in explaining between 36 and 80% of the annual variation in by: 7.

High average minimum and maximum air temperatures during planting time increase yield and planting area for Inlow mean soil temperature, excess rainfall in April caused low yield of spring wheat.

The unmitigated climate variability will result in declines in by: 1. In general, positive effects of precipitation during pregrowing (October–April) and growing seasons (May–September) on the average crop yields have been confirmed.

A 10% increase in pregrowing season precipitation increases the average yield of canola and spring wheat by % and %, by: 7.

Patterns of Production and Precipitation-Use Efficiency of Winter Wheat and Native Grasslands in the Central Great Plains of the United States Article (PDF.

Bridging the exploitable yield gap in the Wimmera region by increasing average Y% to 80% would increase average annual wheat production from M tonnes to M tonnes. maximum and minimum annual temperatures, respectively, in the last years, and the most recent 20 years have resulted in large changes in yield amplitude for the adapted crops spring wheat and canola, and even more so for pea and the relatively new crop lentil.

Saskatoon Annual Climate in Detail. How mean historical and future climate change affects crop yields has received a great deal of attention 1,2,3,4,r, how variations in climate impact crop yield, and how they vary over time Cited by: This banner text can have markup.

web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. Agricultural Meteorology, 17() Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, Amsterdam -- Printed in The Netherlands A SIMULATION MODEL APPROACH FOR RELATING EFFECTIVE CLIMATE TO WINTER WHEAT YIELDS ON THE GREAT PLAINS DANIEL W.

BRIDGE Barnard College, Columbia University, New York, N.Y. (U.S.A.) (Received J ; accepted Cited by: 9. centage of the spring wheat is 43% as the highest and those of the rice is 27% as the lowest (Table 1)˚ •The regions in which CSPI is possible to represent AYLD are The Great Plains and Pampas of America, Great Divid-ing Range of Australia, South East Africa, East China and South East Europe of Eurasia (Figure 1).

and county wheat yield and production gaps in Oklahoma. Fig. Timeline showing the evolution of winter wheat grain yield in the (A) southern Great Plains (SGP), and (B) Oklahoma. Data spans the period from to Trend lines were calculated for the period of totoand to Data were obtained.

Under the scenario that only precipitation changed (Figure 4A) from tothe correlation coefficients between annual precipitation and available soil water in the winter wheat field were,andrespectively at Luochuan, Changwu, Yuncheng, and Yan’an.

The areas’ available soil water amounts in 0– m soil Cited by: 2. Maximum Attainable Wheat Yield and Resource-Use Efficiency in the Southern Great Plains Romulo P.

Lollato* and Jeffrey T. Edwards ABSTRACT Maximum reported grain yields for hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the southern Great Plains range from 6 to 8 Mg ha–1 and are significantly lower than yields achieved in other.

To evaluate dependence of spring wheat grain yield on temperature and precipitation, coefficients of correlations were calculated for the means of on-station grain yield and weather parameters in June, July, and April-August (Table 4). The month of June demonstrated the highest correlation with yield for all three weather by: 1.

Six commercial bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars were evaluated against leaf rust (Puccinia triticina) at two different locations in Egypt during three successive growing seasons, i.e., /, / and / Correlation between eight weekly environmental factors: solar radiation, total precipitation, average wind speed, maximum Author: Walid M.

El-Orabey, Ahmed F. Elkot. precipitation in March and unfertilized grass yield. A major difference between correlations of mature and regrowth yield was that with N, correlations consistently increased mature but not with regrowth yield comparisons.

Table 1. Simple correlation coefficients (r) of crested wheatgrass (fertilized. Correlations between spring rainfall and grain yield were determined for winter wheat cv. Triumph, Wichita, Concho, and Triumph 64 grown between and under dryland conditions at Stillwater, in the E.

central region of Oklahoma, and at Goodwell, located in the drier, W. part of the state. At Stillwater, all but 1 of the cv. exhibited max. positive correlations between rainfall and yield Cited by: 1. Optimum population is a function of the production of environment, the yield goal, and the planting date.

A higher seeding rate is required by low tillering varieties. Seeding rates should be increased by 1% for each day planting is delayed up to a maximum rate of million seeds per acre. Delay in planting reduces yield potential and tiller.Precipitation in June was very critical for spring wheat, with significant positive correlations with grain yield at 6 of 19 sites.

Higher dependence of yield on June precipitation was related to the amount of rainfall received during April-August: at drier sites the response was much more pronounced (S1 Fig).Cited by: 1.Much of this wheat, due to unfavorable moisture and temperature conditions (during the growing season), is even in an average year, below the standard expected of hard red spring wheat.

Irrigation, decreases the average protein content up to 4%, but by means of intense cultural practice (seeding oil seed crops), the grade could be : G.

Obolensky.